Faiz al-Mawaid al-Burhaniyah

A groundbreaking initiative that saw the establishment of community kitchens in towns and cities in different parts of the world where members of the Dawoodi Bohra community reside, the Faiz al-Mawaid al-Burhaniyah (FMB) programme was established with one overarching objective: to provide at least one wholesome and nutritious meal a day to every community household.

The original meaning of faiz (or fayd) indicates an effusion or outpouring, such as water gushing from a stream or a glass filled until the liquid overflows. It has come to connote anything that is profuse or in abundance; for example, abundant generosity. In the name Faiz al-Mawaid al-Burhaniyah, faiz is understood as the abundant blessings or bounties that flow from the mawaid of Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin.
The original meaning of faiz (or fayd) indicates an effusion or outpouring, such as water gushing from a stream or a glass filled until the liquid overflows. It has come to connote anything that is profuse or in abundance; for example, abundant generosity. In the name Faiz al-Mawaid al-Burhaniyah, faiz is understood as the abundant blessings or bounties that flow from the mawaid of Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin.
The original meaning of faiz (or fayd) indicates an effusion or outpouring, such as water gushing from a stream or a glass filled until the liquid overflows. It has come to connote anything that is profuse or in abundance; for example, abundant generosity. In the name Faiz al-Mawaid al-Burhaniyah, faiz is understood as the abundant blessings or bounties that flow from the mawaid of Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin.
Faiz ul Mawaid il Burhaniyah Logo

Key Points About FMB

Established in August 2011 by Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin, the 52nd al-Dai al-Mutlaq of the Dawoodi Bohra community, driven by his desire to eliminate hunger within the community.

Scope:

  • Currently benefits over 135,000 households in 869 cities worldwide.

Operation:

  • Relies on over 7,000 volunteers alongside paid staff.
  • Funded by voluntary donations from community members.
  • Unifies the community regardless of social or economic status.
  • Delivers fresh, nutritious meals daily.

Established in August 2011 by Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin, the 52nd al-Dai al-Mutlaq of the Dawoodi Bohra community, driven by his desire to eliminate hunger within the community.

Scope:

  • Currently benefits over 135,000 households in 869 cities worldwide.

Operation:

  • Relies on over 7,000 volunteers alongside paid staff.
  • Funded by voluntary donations from community members.
  • Unifies the community regardless of social or economic status.
  • Delivers fresh, nutritious meals daily.

Established in August 2011 by Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin, the 52nd al-Dai al-Mutlaq of the Dawoodi Bohra community, driven by his desire to eliminate hunger within the community.

Scope:

  • Currently benefits over 135,000 households in 869 cities worldwide.

Operation:

  • Relies on over 7,000 volunteers alongside paid staff.
  • Funded by voluntary donations from community members.
  • Unifies the community regardless of social or economic status.
  • Delivers fresh, nutritious meals daily.
There is no deed greater than feeding the hungry
Prophet Mohammed states

These words continue to resonate in the hearts of the members of the Dawoodi Bohra community to this day

Food offers more than mere nutritional value and good health. Islam teaches that food is a divine blessing, the grateful acceptance of which is a form of worship.

Sharing food, moreover, is a way of taking care of the vulnerable, bridging societal gaps and bringing the community together. The spirituality inherent in hosting another for a meal or providing food to others, therefore, qualifies it as one of the noblest of deeds.

Currently benefits over 135,000 households in 869 cities worldwide.Relies on over 7,000 volunteers alongside paid staff. Funded by voluntary donations from community members.Unifies the community regardless of social or economic status.Delivers fresh, nutritious meals daily.

Religious Basis

The act of feeding others is rooted in the teachings of Prophet Mohammed, considered the highest form of service.

Spiritual Significance

Sharing food is seen as a form of worship, expressing gratitude for divine blessings and fostering community spirit.

Social Responsibility

 Feeding the hungry transcends religious obligations, fulfilling a social responsibility to care for the vulnerable and bridge societal gaps

The tradition is traced back to the Prophet Mohammed's forefathers, with examples like

  • Maulana Hashim: Providing food and water to pilgrims and the entire population of Makkah during a famine.
  • Imam Ali: Using agricultural profits to feed the people of Kufa in Ramadan.
  • Imam Ali Zayn al-Abideen: Secretly delivering food to needy families at night.
  • Fatimi Imams: Organizing communal meals (mawaid) open to all, regardless of social standing.

Sharing food, moreover, is a way of taking care of the vulnerable, bridging societal gaps and bringing the community together. The spirituality inherent in hosting another for a meal or providing food to others, therefore, qualifies it as one of the noblest of deeds.

Currently benefits over 135,000 households in 869 cities worldwide.Relies on over 7,000 volunteers alongside paid staff. Funded by voluntary donations from community members.Unifies the community regardless of social or economic status.Delivers fresh, nutritious meals daily.

There is no prayer more powerful than the prayer that emanates from someone whose hunger has been satiated for the person who has provided the meal
His Holiness Syedna Mufaddal Saifuddin

Operations

Head Office
Menu and Diet
Finance
Procurement
Smart Kitchens
Health, Safety & Hygiene
Delivery

Feeding thousands of people every single day is a challenging task. Ensuring that the meals prepared are not only flavourful and nutritious but are also like fresh, home-cooked meals makes this task even more challenging.

The FMB team of volunteers comprises professionals such as doctors, dieticians, nutritionists and chefs, who give advice in planning daily menus for the entire year. These menus include regional and seasonal foods. The aim is for the meals to contain all the necessary elements of a balanced diet while meeting the recommended calorie count and nutritional value. Emphasis is also placed on acquiring fresh organic produce from reliable local vendors. Additionally, the use of certain detrimental ingredients is minimised such as trans fat, spices, and artificial colouring as well as artificial flavour enhancers which often bolster taste at the expense of nutritional value.Depending on the day’s menu, the thaali may contain dal, rice, roti, sabzi, soup, salad, khichdi, chicken dishes, biryani, and other Dawoodi Bohra traditional dishes—and sweets on special occasions. or senior citizens with dietary constraints, the items on the menu are prepared with special

Feeding thousands of people every single day is a challenging task. Ensuring that the meals prepared are not only flavourful and nutritious but are also like fresh, home-cooked meals makes this task even more challenging.

The FMB team of volunteers comprises professionals such as doctors, dieticians, nutritionists and chefs, who give advice in planning daily menus for the entire year. These menus include regional and seasonal foods. The aim is for the meals to contain all the necessary elements of a balanced diet while meeting the recommended calorie count and nutritional value. Emphasis is also placed on acquiring fresh organic produce from reliable local vendors. Additionally, the use of certain detrimental ingredients is minimised such as trans fat, spices, and artificial colouring as well as artificial flavour enhancers which often bolster taste at the expense of nutritional value.Depending on the day’s menu, the thaali may contain dal, rice, roti, sabzi, soup, salad, khichdi, chicken dishes, biryani, and other Dawoodi Bohra traditional dishes—and sweets on special occasions. or senior citizens with dietary constraints, the items on the menu are prepared with special

Feeding thousands of people every single day is a challenging task. Ensuring that the meals prepared are not only flavourful and nutritious but are also like fresh, home-cooked meals makes this task even more challenging.

The FMB team of volunteers comprises professionals such as doctors, dieticians, nutritionists and chefs, who give advice in planning daily menus for the entire year. These menus include regional and seasonal foods. The aim is for the meals to contain all the necessary elements of a balanced diet while meeting the recommended calorie count and nutritional value. Emphasis is also placed on acquiring fresh organic produce from reliable local vendors. Additionally, the use of certain detrimental ingredients is minimised such as trans fat, spices, and artificial colouring as well as artificial flavour enhancers which often bolster taste at the expense of nutritional value.Depending on the day’s menu, the thaali may contain dal, rice, roti, sabzi, soup, salad, khichdi, chicken dishes, biryani, and other Dawoodi Bohra traditional dishes—and sweets on special occasions. or senior citizens with dietary constraints, the items on the menu are prepared with special

Feeding thousands of people every single day is a challenging task. Ensuring that the meals prepared are not only flavourful and nutritious but are also like fresh, home-cooked meals makes this task even more challenging.

The FMB team of volunteers comprises professionals such as doctors, dieticians, nutritionists and chefs, who give advice in planning daily menus for the entire year. These menus include regional and seasonal foods. The aim is for the meals to contain all the necessary elements of a balanced diet while meeting the recommended calorie count and nutritional value. Emphasis is also placed on acquiring fresh organic produce from reliable local vendors. Additionally, the use of certain detrimental ingredients is minimised such as trans fat, spices, and artificial colouring as well as artificial flavour enhancers which often bolster taste at the expense of nutritional value.Depending on the day’s menu, the thaali may contain dal, rice, roti, sabzi, soup, salad, khichdi, chicken dishes, biryani, and other Dawoodi Bohra traditional dishes—and sweets on special occasions. or senior citizens with dietary constraints, the items on the menu are prepared with special

All of Creation is a family dependent upon Allah; the most beloved to Him, therefore, is the one who benefits His family the most
Prophet Mohammed states

Initially, the goal of the FMB kitchens was limited to provide nutritious meals to members of the Dawoodi Bohra community across the world on a daily basis.

The tradition is traced back to the Prophet Mohammed's forefathers, with examples like

Community Meal Sharing

  • FMB provides a platform for individuals to share meals during joyful occasions (births, weddings) and times of sorrow (loss of loved ones) within the community.
  • Members can send meals through FMB to households in different locations, fostering a sense of connection and support.
  • Disaster Relief: Following natural disasters like floods, hurricanes, and cyclones, FMB kitchens have actively provided food relief to the wider community.
  • Examples are provided, including relief efforts in:
    •  Maharashtra, Gujarat, Chennai, and Rajasthan (India)
    • Texas and Louisiana (Hurricane Harvey)

Volunteer Dedication

During disaster relief efforts, volunteers have risked their own well-being to serve those in need, showcasing their dedication and selflessness

.

FMB has transcended its initial purpose by facilitating social connections within the community, aiding the wider community during crises, and inspiring volunteer commitment through its expanding range of services.

There is no prayer more powerful than the prayer that emanates from someone whose hunger has been satiated for the person who has provided the meal
His Holiness Syedna Mufaddal Saifuddin

Dana Committee
Preventing Food Loss and Wastage

One-third of all food produced for human consumption throughout the world each year is either lost or wasted. This amounts approximately to an astonishing 1.3 billion tonnes of food. Even though enough food is produced to feed the entire human population, more than 820 million people continue to go hungry. The UN has further warned that the Covid-19 pandemic has resulted in a hunger catastrophe putting a huge number of people at the risk of starvation.

It is my wish that Faiz al-Mawaid al-Burhaniyah reach the home of each and every community member’
His Holiness Syedna Mufaddal Saifuddin
Dana Committee Logo

Islam places great emphasis on preventing waste of all kinds, especially the wastage of food and water. In his sermons and addresses to the community, His Holiness continually emphasises the need for vigilance against wastage. 

To eliminate food waste, community volunteers  formed the Dana Committee (Dana meaning a grain of food) under the aegis of FMB. As of 2021, there are 526 Dana Committees, with 7,853 total members, spread across forty countries.

There is no prayer more powerful than the prayer that emanates from someone whose hunger has been satiated for the person who has provided the meal
His Holiness Syedna Mufaddal Saifuddin

Strengthening Community Bonds

Food is one of the forces that famously binds the Dawoodi Bohras together. Therefore, it is but natural that the community pays special attention to sharing food, hosting others and feeding the hungry. From the traditional manner in which meals are consumed with a group of people sitting around a large circular serving platter known as the thaal, indicating that all those who sit to share a meal are equals, to the fact that identical meals are shared by everyone, young and old, rich and poor, everything about the Bohra culture’s traditional eating habits is reinforced by the egalitarian ethos of FMB.

Strengthening Community Bonds

Food is one of the forces that famously binds the Dawoodi Bohras together. Therefore, it is but natural that the community pays special attention to sharing food, hosting others and feeding the hungry. From the traditional manner in which meals are consumed with a group of people sitting around a large circular serving platter known as the thaal, indicating that all those who sit to share a meal are equals, to the fact that identical meals are shared by everyone, young and old, rich and poor, everything about the Bohra culture’s traditional eating habits is reinforced by the egalitarian ethos of FMB.
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Mohabbat ni Roti

Roti (Indian flatbread) is an integral part of the Dawoodi Bohra culinary tradition and  roti-making, therefore, is one of the most important tasks in the FMB community kitchen. Handmade roti is not only a daily staple but also an expression of love and devotion. His Holiness often refers to them as ‘mohabbat ni roti’ (rotis made out of love), encouraging community members to keep alive the tradition of making rotis by hand as a means of staying active, nourishing the body, nurturing relationships, preserving cultural heritage and providing livelihoods. FMB kitchens reach out to community members willing to contribute by making rotis for the daily meals.

A Legacy Of Philanthropy
While FMB started with the intention of providing a standardised level of nutrition for every community member regardless of their financial standing,

today, it has become much more. It is a manifestation of the Dawoodi Bohra community’s time-honoured philosophy of service to humanity and an expression of love that transcends the bounds of race, class and creed. 

Islam places great emphasis on preventing waste of all kinds, especially the wastage of food and water. In his sermons and addresses to the community, His Holiness continually emphasises the need for vigilance against wastage. 

To eliminate food waste, community volunteers  formed the Dana Committee (Dana meaning a grain of food) under the aegis of FMB. As of 2021, there are 526 Dana Committees, with 7,853 total members, spread across forty countries.

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