Syedna welcomed by Dawoodi Bohra community members to Mombasa

Standard Digital

The global Dawoodi Bohra community leader jetted into the country yesterday with a mission for his followers to support charity and fight hunger.

His Holiness Dr Syedna Mufaddal Saifuddin addressed more than 3,000 faithful and conducted a mass wedding at Mombasa Old Town Bohra mosque after jetting in from Tanzania. He is expected to leave for Kuwait today.

Every year, the spiritual leader’s visits are fashioned along a particular theme and charity activities, whose impact transcends beyond the Bohra community. The theme for this year’s visit is to support charity and feeding the poor and hungry. Last year, the theme for the spiritual leader’s visit was on taking care of the environment. The spiritual leader blessed 5,300 seedlings for planting across the Coast region by the faithful, and also prayed for peaceful elections and prosperity in the country.

Last year, Deputy President William Ruto flew to Mombasa to receive the spiritual leader and commended the community for being industrious and making immense contributions to economic growth. “Members of the Bohra community have made massive investments in furniture, real estate and other sectors and Kenya is not complete without them,” Ruto had told Dr Saifuddin. The community has also heavily invested in health and education sectors, as well as philanthropic activities.

In a statement from the main mosque, Mombasa Bohra Community Secretary Sheikh Zoeb Ezzi said the spiritual leader was on a one-day goodwill mission and had urged the faithful to feed the hungry and the poor. “His Holiness will donate foodstuff before leaving the country. He will also conduct weddings and bless the congregants and the country,” said Ezzi. The spiritual leader is known for, among other teachings, urging his followers to pray and be faithful to their countries. He also provides direction and inspiration to believers throughout the world.

In East Africa, he visits Uganda, Tanzania and Madagascar. Various accounts indicate that the Bohras pride themselves as a close-knit but “self-contained community” in religious and other spheres. They have established institutions that cater for all aspects of individuals’ lives that serve the soul, mind and body.